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Manitoulin Island Ontario

Dawson Resort
Manitoulin Island Ontario










 

Manitoulin Island Ontario has a warm and friendly welcome that awaits you, are you looking for lodging and comfortable cottage accommodations on Manitoulin Island, Ontario? To satisfy your accommodation needs, there are the following motels, resorts, lodges, bed & breakfasts and campgrounds, all of these accommodations and places to stay are located on Manitoulin Island in northern Ontario, Canada.


Dawson Resort on Manitoulin Island


cottage resort on Manitoulin Island

How To Filet A Walleye
Manitoulin Island

 

 
 
Canadian Fishing Vacation in Ontario Canada

FISHING WALLEYE IN CANADA

How To Filet A Walleye



FISHING

How To Filet A Walleye

Walleye (Sander Vitreus) are a game fish found in lakes, rivers, streams and reservoirs. They are most abundant in Canada and throughout the Midwest, especially Lake Erie. Because of its abundance of Walleye, Lake Erie is often referred to as the walleye capitol of the world.

Walleye are sometimes called walleye pike, yellow pickerel, yellow pike, or pike perch and have been incorrectly identified as a member of the pike family. A quick look at the dorsal fins of the walleye (two fins) and the pike (one fin) shows that the two are not from the same family.

Walleye are similar in body shape to both sauger and yellow perch. However, walleye can be identified by the dark spot found at the bottom of their first dorsal fin and their large canine teeth. Saugers lack the dark spot and yellow perch lack the large teeth. Most walleye are yellow, but occasionally a variation occurs which gives the fish a blue color. Called "blue phase," these fish are not blue pike.

Walleye prefer the deep water sections of large lakes, streams, and rivers. They have large, light-sensitive eyes that help them locate food in poor light. To protect their eyes from the sun, walleye stay in sheltered or deep water during the day and move into shallower water at night. They are voracious predators and use their large canine teeth to catch a variety of minnows and the young of other fishes. Yellow perch are often a favorite meal.

Spawning takes place from mid-March to early April. Adult walleye randomly release their eggs over rocky bottoms of lake shoals or gravel bars in rivers and streams. The eggs fall between the rock crevices to hatch.

Walleye are one of the most mild tasting and best eating fish around and they are very easy to filet. Below, I will detail how to filet a walleye:

1. A sharp filet knife is a must, or an electric two bladed knife- the kind that mom used to carve the turkey with on Thanksgiving.

2. Start by grabbing the walleye by the gill with your weaker hand and with knife in your other hand make a cut from behind the gill down to the backbone, making sure not to cut through the backbone:

Filit walleye

3. Now find the backbone again and run your knife along the backbone cutting through all of the rib bones toward the tail, but making sure not to cut through the backbone. Stop when you are about 1/2 inch from the tail, then flip the whole piece over to your right while it is still partially attached to the tail.

Filit walleye

Filit walleye

4. Once the filet is flipped over now run your knive through the flesh down to the skin and run the knive along the skin and it should come clean away from the fish.( this takes some practice, but the sharper the knife the better) Then cut all the way through, cutting the fillet loose from the skin.

5. Now turn the walleye over and do the same to the other side, you should have two fillets with the ribs still attached.

6. Lay the fillet so that the ribs are away from you and place the electric knife under the ribs and keeping it flat against the ribs cut away from you removing the ribs.

Filit walleye

7. Un-zipping the "Y" bone. Looking at the filet above you can see at the tail end where the "Y" bone runs the length of the fillet down the center (the red marks down the center, the full length of the fillet). I take a standard (not electric) knife and cut about 1 to 2 inches in from the tail end of the fillet down both sides (parallel with) of the "Y" bone to the tail. Now take the "Y" bone in one hand and one side of the fillet (where you cut the notch) in the other and gently pull the 1/2 fillet away from the "Y" bone until it is free. Now do the same to the other side. If it fails to tear free you may have to take your knife and trim off what is left of the "Y" bone.

You should now have four pieces of fillet out of one walleye, completely boneless. Turn the pieces over so that the skin side is up toward you, if you see any dark meat (the bigger the fish the more dark). I like to then turn the fillet over so the dark meat is down, take my standard fillet knife and lay it where the dark and light meat join and shave it off the fillet. This dark meat is what gives walleye a strong fishy taste.

We then rinse the fillets in clean water two or three times until they are clean, then place a meals size portion in a quart zip lock bag, fill the bag with fresh water until it is above the fillets, then zip the bag shut while squeezing the air out of the bag. Once I have the bag closed with no air inside, I lay them on their side in the freezer and let them freeze solid. This makes it easier to stack them when storing them for winters use.

 

 

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Join us on Manitoulin Island for a great Canadian Vacation and Family Hot Spot in Northern Ontario Canada

Dawson Resort
Manitoulin Island Ontario


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